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DJK11
04-11-2012, 03:49 PM
I have about 300 nickel 9 mm cases and more than 650 nickel 45 acp cases. Some are from SD rounds and most of the 45 are from the Remington nickel FMJ rounds. I've reloaded these once already.

I've heard the nickel brass is considerably harder than plain brass cases.

So, can the nickel brass sustain multiple reload cycles like plain brass cases?

45 acp is low pressure compared to 9 mm and generally can.

What is the opinion of the Kahr Talk experts?

Bawanna
04-11-2012, 04:53 PM
I've reloaded mine numerous times but I think you are correct in that they are harder. I generally set them aside and use them for "special" loads. I'll use them for loading bullets that I could use for defense if necessary, or trying something different than the norm.

I never carry with anything but factory ammo but I have some loaded that would work if it ever became necessary.

I just visually inspect the case prior to loading for any warning signs, cracks, bulges etc.

MW surveyor
04-11-2012, 05:18 PM
I've read that the nickle plated cases don't last as long and I've seen some flaking when I've reloaded them. Like Bawanna, I only use them for "special" 38 spl and 357 rounds so they don't get reloaded very often. Never have reloaded any of the 9mm or 45 cases. Hardly find that many of them where I shoot.

As with the brass cases, you do need to inspect them. I inspect mine before sizing, after sizing and after setting the bullet.

Sliebl
04-11-2012, 05:26 PM
When I bought my 45, I purchased a box of new Starline nickle plated brass to get me started with reloading. So far, I believe I'm on my 4th reloading, and the brass is holding up well (as to be expected from Starline brass). I will say that I will never buy nickle plated cases again since it's more difficult to see in the outdoor pistol pits that I shoot in due to the stone/gravel surface. I didn't consider that when I bought it, but... live and learn.

I haven't found these cases to be more difficult to load than standard brass cases, but you may be correct regarding the hardness. I'll reload them until I see signs of distress in the cases.

jocko
04-11-2012, 06:00 PM
for some reason I would think nickel brass cases would be more expensive to make..Just sayi

found this:

A long time ago, cops carried their ammo in belt loops (you still sometimes see an old timer with a .38 Special or a .357 and a slide-on ammo carrier with loops.)

Brass ammo, carried month after month, would corrode, and form green verdigris on the surface. The answer was to offer nickle-plated brass. People got the idea that somehow nickle-plated was "better" and ammo companies began to take advantage of this.

If you don't carry your ammo exposed, there is no reason for nickle-plating (and nickle plated ammo, in my experience is more prone to crack in reloading after a few firings.)

One exception might be a long hunting trip in the tropics, where you were concerned about corrosion from high humidity and heat, and might choose nickle-plated rifle ammo.

and then found this:
I've seen and read that old wive's tale for a lot of years.. but I have nickel cases that have been loaded so many times that the nickel is coming off and the brass is showing through. I get an equal # of nickel and brass cases that split at the mouth (that gets work hardened being flared to seat bullets and crimped to be able to feed into the firearm). The theory is dissimilar metals causes the splitting, but I just have not found this to be true

and lastly I found this:

Price



Nickel-plated cartridges are made by adding the nickel-plating to an ordinary brass cartridge. That's why the nickel-plated cartridges typically cost more than the brass versions.


Appearance



Brass cartridges are dark gold. Nickel-plated cartridges will give the coated brass a silver appearance.





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Surface Texture



Brass cartridges are the smoother of the two. Nickel plating will tend to give the cartridge a rough surface which is commonly described as similar to sandpaper.


Firing Cleanness



Brass cartridges come out of the gun chamber cleanly, with little residue. Nickel plating tends to flake off and leave shavings behind when a round is fired.


Durability



Brass cartridges are durable in and out of the weapon. Nickel-plated cartridges are more moisture resistant in a gun and an ammunition belt.


Diameter and Metal Expansion



The nickel plating added to brass cartridges will add a thickness of 30 to 80 microinches to the cartridge, making them rounder in diameter than a plain brass cartridge. Brass will not expand as rapidly in the heat that occurs when the gun is fired. Nickel plating will already be a tight fit in the chamber and will expand rapidly when the gun is fired. This creates more potential for the weapon to jam and for extra nickel plating residue to be left inside the weapon



Read more: Cartridges: Brass Vs. Nickel-Plated | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_7901806_cartridges-brass-vs-nickelplated.html#ixzz1rmQfUmXo
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DJK11
04-12-2012, 01:39 PM
Everyone,

Thank you for the info and our opinions.

Keep loading!

bapple
04-20-2012, 09:51 AM
I keep all nickel-plated brass aside for hollow point loads.

For my home defense and EDC loads that I made myself with Blue Dot, I use nickel plated brass. Once I've fired one of them once after they start to get old I usually just shoot them and put them in my brass case rotation. Then when they start to peel and crack, I toss them.

Mudcat
05-06-2012, 10:16 AM
I do not treat them any differently just load them as I pick them out of the bucket. I have some that have been loaded many many times.

wyntrout
05-06-2012, 04:27 PM
I prefer the nickel-plated brass for SD ammo because I do believe it's corrosive resistant and "slicker" which enhances chambering the cartridges. I don't reload anymore, so I don't worry about any problems with that.

Wynn:)

Mattias44
05-15-2012, 10:50 AM
The nickel plated cases are nice to have on hand if only to differentiate between lots.

TonyT
06-09-2012, 07:58 PM
My 38 Special nickeled cases dispaly frayed ends and splits faster than brass cases. In 45ACP the difference appears minimal. I only reload high pressure cartridge brass (9mm, 40 S&W) 4 times before consigning them to the scrap heap and have not noticed any difference between brass and nickeled cases..

TonyT
09-01-2012, 06:51 PM
I have about 300 nickel 9 mm cases and more than 650 nickel 45 acp cases. Some are from SD rounds and most of the 45 are from the Remington nickel FMJ rounds. I've reloaded these once already.

I've heard the nickel brass is considerably harder than plain brass cases.

So, can the nickel brass sustain multiple reload cycles like plain brass cases?

45 acp is low pressure compared to 9 mm and generally can.

What is the opinion of the Kahr Talk experts?
I use both the brass and nickel plated cases in 9mm, 38 Special, 357 Magnum, 40 S&W and 45ACP. The nickel plated cases tend to vbecome more brittle and lead to case splits before the plaoin brass cases. I expereince this more frequently with the 38 Special and 357 Magnum brass. As a matter of policy I only reload the high pressure cartridges (9mm, 40 S&W) four ties before consigning them to scrap. With the mild loads in the other calibers I tend to use the brass until it starts fraying at the mouth or partially splits.

Bongo Boy
11-29-2012, 12:21 AM
I have a few hundred nickel plated cases in 45 and it's what I use for my SD loads--only because I think they 'look cool' and for easy identification. When I go to the range and pull out my carry weapon, I generally empty the relatively expensive (and punishing) SD rounds out of the magazine, then proceed to shoot other loads. When I'm all done, it's easy to ensure I'm reloading with the desired cartridges.

I just saw nickel plated brass for $5 less per thousand at Southern Belle--I actually paid the higher price for non-plated cases.

Hey wyntrout, I retired from the USAF in '96, too!

Charlie98
11-30-2012, 08:12 AM
The nickel plated cases tend to vbecome more brittle and lead to case splits before the plaoin brass cases. I expereince this more frequently with the 38 Special and 357 Magnum brass.

I had very much the same experience with my .357 brass (split necks,) but not my .45Colt brass, and the .45C brass gets worked much harder in the resizer (oversized Winchester chamber.) I do segregate my nickle brass away from my regular brass, but this is just because I'm anal about stuff like that... I even segregate by headstamp in my 'mixed' .45ACP brass bin (about 2000 cases.) I reload my nickle brass with defensive ammo-equivalent practice loads (.380, .45ACP,) or full-house rounds (.41Mag, .45Colt.)

I prefer nickle brass in my carry rounds because of the corrosion issue and I think the potential is there to feed easier.

One other 'old wives tale' of note is the surface hardness and chamber wear. Brass is softer and won't 'wear' the chamber as much during cycling; nickle brass is harder. The other component is with debris in the chamber... plain brass will give before the steel of the chamber will, nickle brass less so. Supposedly this could scratch or wear the chamber more. TBH, I don't give it any consderation given the volume of ammo I run.